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How To Get Out Of Depression Slump

Posted at September 19th, 2022 | Categorised in How to

How To Get Out Of Depression Slump – So… you’ve probably noticed that I’ve taken a break from blogging over the last few months. Let me fill you in on what’s going on behind the scenes.

As many of you know, I moved back to Los Angeles in May. I love living here, it’s been an adjustment. I’ve lived on the East Coast all my life, so it’s been a big life change for me, and there’s been good times here and there, but also rough times. Oh, and I’m also writing a book while traveling across the country, and to be honest, I’ve had a lot of impostor syndrome during this writing process.

How To Get Out Of Depression Slump

I was also diagnosed with depression in March 2020 (coincidentally a week before COVID-19 was declared a pandemic) and started taking anti-depressants and medication as a result.

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But what happens? Grab a cup of coffee (or a glass of wine, whatever your drink of choice!) and let’s get down to it.

I don’t know how long I suffered from depression before I was officially diagnosed last year, but this mental illness combined with my anxiety makes me not like the things I normally like.

. It’s not that I don’t like blogging. On days when I’m really depressed, there’s nothing in life that I really enjoy, so when I’m down, my routine quickly falls apart. Also, I am very forgetful at times and it is hard to focus with the brain fog I sometimes experience.

Anyway, please forgive me if I forget to reply to texts or DMs – difficulty concentrating is one of the most prominent symptoms of depression, which I’m still trying to overcome. Ping me again if I don’t respond; Trust me, it’s me and not you!

Great Depression Story Board Storyboard By Karlibrooke

That being said, am I homesick? Did I miss the East Coast? Not really. I’ve heard horror stories about going to LA and hating it, and really? I already feel like a little family here. I was lucky enough to have roots in the city before I moved here, and the social transition was seamless. I’m also very social, and when I’m at the movies, the grocery store, my apartment building, I’m amazed at how many people come up to me and hang out… you name it.

Is the traffic terrible? Yes, but I’m also from DC and find the traffic in Northern Virginia comparable so it doesn’t bother me. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

Are you enjoying life in LA? Socially yes. Cooperation is also a dream. The shooting possibilities here are almost endless! I’m not playing a lie; I miss fall on the east coast, but I’m coming back to enjoy it – problem solved! The only thing I can’t deal with right now is the gas prices and taxes here, but hey – it’s a little less when you live in paradise, right?

It’s almost gone at my place now. Everything is now mostly back-ordered.

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Unfortunately, I am a mentally ill person. Plus, cross-country running and writing a book fired me up more than I could have ever imagined. At first I took a random break because I was trying to separate writing books and moving. Then I wanted to take some time to catch up in this new city. And then… I had several depressive episodes when I fell.

At the outset, it must be said that everyone is different. For me, I lose motivation easily. Before the pandemic I had high performance depression which meant I could meet my deadlines 100%. However, after work I find myself scrolling on my phone, doing nothing productive and feeling really bad inside. No matter how many classes I took or how clean my diet was, I felt like I had very little energy. Focusing and not responding to messages is also an important feature for me.

My high performance depression turned into low performance depression during the pandemic and there were times when I was out of bed for hours. Despite my anxiety, I find myself scrolling through my phone, avoiding possible situations other than the day. I hated writing. I hated taking pictures. He criticized how I looked in every photo shoot. I never thought my work was enough. I didn’t even feel like leaving my house or making plans with people.

Nothing in particular gets me down: I can have the best weekend of my life and fall into a black hole the next day. Honestly, it’s unpredictable, uncomfortable and very intense.

Stress, Anxiety, Or Depression? Treatment Starts With The Right Diagnosis > News > Yale Medicine

First: it’s not an easy thing and I’ve been working with a therapist for the last two years to sort it out. Treatment is important if you can afford it (I hate how expensive it is, but it’s an investment I need). When you go to therapy and your therapist gives you “homework,” do it. Don’t put it off. The steps you take outside of treatment are important.

I work from home and still don’t have a chair so I might as well spend a good day in bed (it’s scary). Every day I have to make plans to get out of bed. It could be something as simple as going to an exercise class, signing up for a work day, or scheduling work in my building’s business center at a specific time. Making plans doesn’t mean going out with friends, so if you’re not in a social mood, there are still things you can do to get out of the house and get some fresh air.

Social media is weird even when I’m in a depressed phase… it’s my job. To be honest, I have a virtual assistant who occasionally posts on Instagram on my behalf, which comes in handy when I’m not feeling well. I like to get off social media, go for a walk, make plans with friends, play a game or watch a movie when I’m not in a good mood.

I think it’s important to stay in touch with people when you’re depressed, no matter how hard it is. Pick up the phone when your relatives call you. Follow along. Make dinner plans. My depression can make me cancel plans and retreat to my depression cave (AKA my bed), but maintaining social activities is important.

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I don’t have all the answers. But if you feel like me, I can tell you that you are not alone. Mental illness can be complicated to understand, but with therapy I learn new ways to cope with it every week. As we head into the fourth quarter, I hope to stay on top of this blog and continue its content – ​​and not let disappointment derail my plans!

Have you ever had to overcome a depressive episode? Let me know in the comments below (and share if you’re hesitant!)

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The Pandemic Induced Global Slump Is Just Part Of A 20 Year Financial Crisis

If you disable this cookie, we will not be able to save your preferences. This means that you will have to enable or disable cookies again each time you visit this website. They are concerned about the rising cost of health care in the country, have trouble affording it, and wonder if they will be able to afford care in the future. A quarter of US adults cite discrimination based on race and gender as a significant source of stress. And on a personal level, work and money ranked as the top two stressors, all according to a 2019 study.

Where constant stress resides is its more irritating and debilitating cousin: anxiety. According to the US National Institute of Mental Health, about 31% of Americans will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their lives, with older women and younger adults experiencing it more often than men. They will be tested.

In addition, anxiety often accompanies depression. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, nearly half of people diagnosed with depression also have an anxiety disorder. “About 7% of the US population meets the criteria for major depressive disorder,” says Rachel Katz, MD, a psychiatrist at Yale Psychiatric Hospital.

How is that

Ua Archive: The Slump: …seasonal Depression

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